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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

November, 2017

Conservation History: Northwest Bay, Lake George


Lands above Northwest Bay acquired by Stephen and Mary Loines between 1898 and 1908 – in part to protect them from the same destructive forces that threatened the Adirondacks – and which were sold to private landowners over the ensuing decades, are now largely protected again, this time permanently, thanks to land conservancies and New York State. That’s something Tim Barnett recognized last spring, when the Lake George Land Conservancy announced that it had purchased a 159 acre parcel that includes Wing Pond “This would appear to complete a four decade- long project to protect the Loines holdings,” remarked Barnett, >>More


November, 2017

Julian Reiss’s Missing Airplane Engine


Julian Reiss’s plane crash on the evening of Halloween 1958 remains one of the more unusual in the Adirondacks. While most Adirondack plane crashes involve Forest Rangers, State Police, and many civilian volunteers, this one was different. This search was over almost before it got started when the ‘victims’ walked out of the woods the next day. Shortly thereafter, the Lake Placid village police, the NY State Police and its investigation division, the BCI, became involved. Earlier that day Reiss had picked up his plane in Norwood, MA, where it had gotten a new engine and a thorough » Continue >>More


November, 2017

Glens Falls Feeder Canal Program Nov 15th


The Warren County Historical Society will host a program on the Glens Falls Feeder Canal on Wednesday, November 15 at 7 pm, at 50 Gurney Lane in Queensbury, NY. This program will focus on the past, present and future of the Feeder Canal that was once the economic engine of the area. The Glens Falls Feeder Canal is the oldest original canal still used to provide water to the Champlain Canal. This presenter for this program is Jeanne Williams, the Executive Director of the Feeder Canal Alliance. Jeanne has been associated with National Museum of Racing, the National Museum of >>More


November, 2017

5 Myths About New York’s Suffrage Centennial


As of November 6, 1917, the State of New York became the first state east of the Mississippi to grant full voting rights to women. The tremendous support from New York City overcame the lack of support from most upstate counties. Essex County was one exception, approving woman suffrage by a margin of 15 votes: 2838 to 2823. “Newcomb is the Banner Suffrage Town” announced the Adirondack Record. The town “did her bit” for the ladies, casting 73 votes for suffrage and only 6 against. “Newcomb is certainly most chivalrous.” Minerva, North Elba, St. Armand, Ticonderoga and Westport also approved >>More


November, 2017

Bennett Brothers; An Adirondack Witch Tale (Conclusion)


At the end of 1915, a year and a half after their mother was removed from the home, conditions had hardly improved for the Bennett brothers of Hope in Hamilton County. Their father, badly troubled by rheumatism, had hired a man to operate the farm, and the boys were learning to do for themselves whatever their father couldn’t. Dr. Edwin Hagedorn, after examining the three boys, said each suffered from “fatty degeneration of the heart,” and that their muscles had atrophied to such an extent that even walking might well be outside the realm of possibility. On the plus side, >>More


November, 2017

Early Settlers of the Beaver River Country


Settlement came slowly to the upper Beaver River valley in the west central Adirondacks. John Brown Francis, governor of Rhode Island and grandson of John Brown, the original titleholder, built the first road from Lowville to Number Four in 1822 with the hope of starting a village there. To spur settlement he gave 100 acres each to the first ten families willing to clear the land and establish farms. A number of pioneers moved in, the first of which was a man named Orrin Fenton who arrived in 1826. By 1835 there were about 75 residents. Gradually all attempts at >>More


November, 2017

Military Theaters of the American Revolution Symposium


The American Revolution Round Table: Hudson-Mohawk Valleys is hosting a free event on Saturday, November 11, 2017 from 8 am to 4:15 pm. The Military Theaters of the American Revolution Symposium is based on the book of the same name, Theaters of the American Revolution. Five experts on the American Revolution will discuss the Northern Theater, the Western Theater, the War at Sea, the Southern Theater, and the Middle Theater. Speakers include: Mark Edward Lender, Emeritus Professor of History at Kean University; James Kirby Martin, Charles B. Ewing Visiting Professor of Military History, USMA, West Point; Charles Neimeyer, Director and >>More


October, 2017

Sarah Bennett’s Babies: Years of Sickness


Local authorities, including the Humane Society, considered taking action to alleviate conditions in  John and Sarah Bennett’s home at Hope in Hamilton County. Some believed the Bennett’s three sons were being held captive by their mother, perhaps under a kind of spell.  After checking in on the three Bennett brothers,  Dr. George Peters of Gloversville rendered this assessment: “I have examined George, Ward, and Frank Bennett of Hope, New York, and it is my opinion that if the three young men were taken from their home, or even if they were left at home and placed under the tutorship of >>More


October, 2017

New Book Tells History Of Park’s African-Americans


It’s obvious to anyone who spends time here that the vast majority of people who live in or visit the Adirondack Park are white. This could have consequences for the Forest Preserve, because the Preserve belongs to all New Yorkers and its future is in their hands. The latest census data indicate that about 18 percent of the state’s population is African-American (another 19 percent is Hispanic or Latino). Although few African-Americans live in the Adirondacks, our region is not without its own black history. Most people will think of John Brown’s farm in North Elba and Gerrit Smith’s effort >>More


October, 2017

Lake George History Roundtable Planned


Historians, cultural and environmental groups, museums, and community members are invited to a roundtable discussion that highlights the Lake George region communities and their stories on Friday, November 3, 2017, from 10 am to 3 pm, at the Bolton Historical Museum at 4924 Lake Shore Drive, Bolton Landing. Participants will discuss topics such as the history, photographic collections, and environmental stewardship of the region. Participants will identify what is visible in the landscape related to these topics, the stories of the people, the sites and events to visit, and what resources can be found in libraries and museum collections. Lake >>More