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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

October, 2017

Postal History of World War One Program in Ticonderoga


The Ticonderoga Historical Society has invited the public to a free program focusing on the Postal Service in World War One, on Friday, November 3 at 7 pm. Featured speaker will be Glenn Estus, President of the Vermont Philatelic Society. As part of the overall support for U.S. Entry into World War One, The United States Post Office Department participated in efforts to help raise funds. One method included cancelling mail with slogans that encouraged Americans to buy Liberty Loans. The United States was not alone in this effort, and this program will also show how allied nations such as >>More


October, 2017

A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War


A companion catalog to the New York State Museum exhibition of the same name, Aaron Noble’s new book A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War (SUNY Press, 2017) documents the statewide story of New York in World War I through the collections of the New York State Museum, Library, and Archives. Within the collections are the nearly 3,600 posters of the Benjamin W. Arnold World War I Poster Collection at the New York State Library. The book interweaves the story of New York in the Great War with some of these posters, and artifacts from >>More


October, 2017

Adirondack Witchcraft? Sarah Bennett’s Babies in Hope, NY


This story is about as bizarre as it gets. Locals in the Wells and Northville area were privy to the odd situation when it first came under public scrutiny a little over a century ago. At that time, a goal of regional counties seeking tourism dollars was providing easier public access to the Adirondacks, which was achieved in part by building new roads and improving old ones. In southeastern Hamilton County, Northville marked the end of rail access in 1910. From there, stage lines carried visitors north through the hamlet of Hope to Wells and beyond. To accommodate automobiles, which >>More


October, 2017

A Great Pumpkin Prank; Pumpkin Production In NYS


McGraw Hall, Cornell University’s first building, is certainly the most recognizable symbol of the University and, arguably, one of the state’s most iconic buildings. Built in 1891 and named for Jennie McGraw, a close family friend of University co-founder, Ezra Cornell. McGraw Hall’s clock tower, which houses the 21-bell Cornell Chimes; played three times a day and heard all over campus, stands 173-feet-tall, with an extremely steep 20-foot-high tiled roof-spire. It holds a commanding presence from vantage points all around the city of Ithaca. So, on the morning of October 8, 1997, Cornell students, faculty, and staff were baffled when they >>More


October, 2017

A Fisher of Men and a Fish in the Water


A few weeks ago, the Adirondacks and North Country lost a native who led a unique life, a man who three years ago added “author” to his resume. Robert “Bob” Manning of Massena passed away on September 28 at the age of 81. My personal connection with him is a strange one indeed. We met back in 1966, but I hadn’t been in touch with him since 1969, so you might suppose that our phone conversation in 2014, when we became reacquainted, might have been a bit awkward. It sure could have been, but not for the reason you might >>More


October, 2017

New Exhibit On Water At Chapman Museum


The Chapman Museum in Glens Falls has announced a new fall exhibit, H2O: A Brief History of our Relationship to Water, which will open October 19th with a reception from 5:30 to 7:30 pm. H2O examines the historical uses of water in the Glens Falls region from the mid-19th century, when people depended on private wells, to the present day. It explores the development of a municipal water supply after the Glens Falls fire of 1864, the transition from water power to electrical generators on the Hudson River, the role of the river and the Feeder Canal » Continue Reading. View >>More


October, 2017

A 1940 St. Lawrence Co Army Maneuvers Project


On Thursday, October 19th, 2017, at noon, the St. Lawrence County Historical Association will host a panel of local residents who will recall their experiences during the 1940 U.S. Army Maneuvers that were held around the North County. This panel is part of the Brown Bag Lunch Series, lunch time lecture series dedicated to the memory of Patricia Harrington Carson, who founded the series during her 24 years as a Trustee of the St. Lawrence County Historical Association. Brown Bag Lunches are free and open to the public: bring your own lunch and enjoy a » Continue Reading. View original >>More


October, 2017

1900 Suffrage Convention Reenactment Set For Glens Falls


The Glens Falls Area Suffrage Centennial Committee has announced they will hold a 1900 Suffrage Convention reenactment to commemorate the New York State Woman Suffrage Centennial in Glens Falls on Saturday, October 21 from 1 to 3 pm at the First Baptist Church at 100 Maple Street. The event will reenact the annual New York State Woman Suffrage Association Convention held at Rockwell House, and Ordway Hall in Glens Falls in the autumn of 1900. Speeches will be presented by historians and reenactors in period attire. National figures to be portrayed at the Convention include Carrie Chapman Catt, Rev. Anna >>More


October, 2017

Jack Lagree: Dannemora’s Bobsled Guru


Flush with success in the North Country Championships, taking first and second place, the Lagree Bobsled Club teams were off to St. Moritz, Switzerland, to practice and prepare for the upcoming world championships. In the end, the American squads were disappointed with their results in Europe, finishing fifteenth and twenty-third. For Jack, it meant nothing more than getting back to work. He was already planning to prepare up to four sleds for the next Olympics. Despite growing competition from several large American corporations, the results coming out of Jack’s tiny garage were highly sought after by the best bobsledders in >>More


October, 2017

Mohawk Iron Workers ‘Skydancer’ Film Screening Planned


TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, has invited the public to a presentation of Skydancer, a film about the Mohawk iron-workers who regularly commute from Akwesasne to New York City to work on the “high steel,” building the skyscrapers of Manhattan. This 2011 film by Academy Award-nominated director Katja Esson follows iron-workers Jerry McDonald Thundercloud and Sky Fox as they shuttle between the hard drinking Brooklyn lodging houses they call home during the week and their family lives, a grueling drive six hours north back home to Akwesasne, NY, on the weekends. Through archival documents and interviews, it also >>More