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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

February, 2019

Warren Co Historical Society Names Leadership


The Warren County Historical Society (WCHS) offers historical programs, a Resource Center, a Book and Gift Shop, historical and genealogical research, archives and collections, the quarterly newsletter Pastimes, museum displays, and historic preservation advocacy. The Society is headquartered at 50 Gurney Lane, in Queensbury where a new, permanent exhibit, “Warren County 360: Celebrating Place and People,” is planned for Summer 2019. The Society has a membership of 175 and is funded by memberships, donations, grants, and fundraisers. Society officers for 2019 are: Co-Presidents – Wayne Wright and Dr. Stan Cianfarano; Vice President – Judy Melkonian; Secretary – Marianne Moran; Treasurer >>More


February, 2019

Jackie Archer: North Country Civil Rights Leader (1964)


In 1964, Jackie Archer had several irons in the fire. She was a member of the Beekmantown PTA and was very active in several religious capacities as secretary of the Board of Christian Education of the First Baptist Church; a member of the church’s Guild and Missionary Society; a substitute Sunday school teacher; and, in June, she became Recording Secretary for the Clinton County Council of Churches. Much of her time, however, was devoted ongoing issues of concerned to the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and its leader Paul Lewis: job and >>More


February, 2019

My First Trout and The Rainmakers


My advice to nine-year-old wanna-be trout anglers is: “Do not wear a sweater.” Repeat: “Do not wear a sweater.” My earliest trout fishing days in and around Bakers Mills in today’s Siamese Ponds Wilderness Area were frustrating because my own fishhook invariably caught mainly my sweater. And we mostly used night crawlers not artificial flies then. Better to wear something less adept at snagging stray hooks. Try thick vinyl, maybe. I was considered too young to carry a knife of my own. To resume fishing once I snagged my own sweater, I had to plead with Cub Schaefer to stop >>More


February, 2019

Whallonsburg Grange Purchases 1950s Whitcomb’s Garage


The Whallonsburg Grange Hall, has announce that it has purchased Whitcomb’s Garage in Whallonsburg, the vacant building and land directly across Whallons Bay Road from the Grange. The 1950s-era garage, on a 1.5-acre lot along the Boquet River, was owned by Clarence “Narni” Whitcomb.   Whitcomb was a lifelong resident of Whallonsburg who sold and serviced cars there until the 1990s; he died in 2017.  The purchase was made possible through a dedicated, anonymous donation. The Whallonsburg Grange Hall, built by the local Grange chapter in 1915, was renovated and restored through a ten-year-long volunteer effort. It is now open year-round as >>More


February, 2019

Jackie Archer: A North Country Civil Rights Inspiration


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. inspired a national movement and remains a catalyst for peaceful change after he was martyred for the cause. He was hardly beloved by all: many felt threatened by him, and when he protested against the war in Vietnam, many criticized him for losing focus and supposedly deserting the primary goal of addressing racial inequality. Millions supported his efforts, but it was a chaotic time, filled with uncertainty about the future. With the bitterness, hatred, and violence that was revealed, even on the nightly TV news, it sometimes seemed doubtful that true change could ever be >>More


February, 2019

Event Highlights Ticonderoga on the Eve of Revolution


Fort Ticonderoga is set to host a living history event Saturday, February 16, 2019 about British garrison life in February 1775, three months before Ticonderoga was pulled into the American War of Independence. Living history programs feature the weapons, trades, and home life of soldiers and families during peacetime at Ticonderoga. A one-time only exhibit will highlight rare objects from the Fort Ticonderoga Museum collection that are a tangible reminder of the men and women that called Fort Ticonderoga home before the American Revolution. Highlighted programming throughout the day brings to life the experience of soldiers in the 26th Regiment >>More


February, 2019

Lorraine Duvall: Why We Seek Wilderness


In March 1848 a colleague of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Harrison Gray Otis Blake, sought out Henry David Thoreau to help him on his spiritual pilgrimage, recognizing Thoreau’s need to live a “fresh, simple life with God.” Thoreau wanted to live his life free from the trappings of the commercial world, enabling him to enrich his inner life. He escaped to his Walden Pond to experience “nature as goodness crystalized.” These two gentlemen corresponded for thirteen years. Letters to a Spiritual Seeker, published in 2004, contains 45 of Thoreau’s letters to Blake. Thoreau writes about the practicality of financially supporting himself, >>More


February, 2019

Disappointing Personal Lessons in Racism


The arrival of Black History Month (also known as African American History Month in the US) is a time to discuss and celebrate the achievements and lives of many brave souls who came before us. On a personal level, my thoughts turn to a dichotomy of experiences: pride that historically, New Yorkers in general have stood on the side of civil rights and equality for all, but dismay at several personal recollections when racism unexpectedly reared its head right before my eyes. In northern New York, our legacy is one of standing up against racism — not uniformly, but in >>More


February, 2019

Adirondack World of Edna West Teall at ADKX


Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX) annual winter Cabin Fever Sunday Series is underway, featuring seven events that look deeper into Adirondack history and culture. The next event, The Adirondack World of Edna West Teall with Laura Rice and Elizabeth Folwell, is set for February 10th, at 1:30 pm. Born in 1881 and raised in the small community of Reber, Edna West Teall exemplified the Adirondack ideal of self-reliance and resourcefulness. She taught herself to write, and became a successful journalist for the Newark Evening News. In retirement she returned to her Adirondack childhood home and taught >>More


February, 2019

Adirondack History Museum Seeking 46er Summit Canisters


The Adirondack History Museum is starting a campaign to gather as many Adirondack 46er summit canisters as possible to incorporate in their Hiking the Adirondack High Peaks exhibit. The Museum currently has four canisters, from Seward, Marshall, Santanoni, and Esther. Their goal is to be the repository for the entire collection, to be permanently displayed at the Adirondack History Museum. Canisters once dotted the summits of 22 peaks the 46ers designated as trailless. In the late 1940s, there were so many Band-Aid tins and other handy receptacles left on these peaks with hikers’ names in them, some not on the >>More