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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

November, 2017

Early Settlers of the Beaver River Country


Settlement came slowly to the upper Beaver River valley in the west central Adirondacks. John Brown Francis, governor of Rhode Island and grandson of John Brown, the original titleholder, built the first road from Lowville to Number Four in 1822 with the hope of starting a village there. To spur settlement he gave 100 acres each to the first ten families willing to clear the land and establish farms. A number of pioneers moved in, the first of which was a man named Orrin Fenton who arrived in 1826. By 1835 there were about 75 residents. Gradually all attempts at >>More


November, 2017

Military Theaters of the American Revolution Symposium


The American Revolution Round Table: Hudson-Mohawk Valleys is hosting a free event on Saturday, November 11, 2017 from 8 am to 4:15 pm. The Military Theaters of the American Revolution Symposium is based on the book of the same name, Theaters of the American Revolution. Five experts on the American Revolution will discuss the Northern Theater, the Western Theater, the War at Sea, the Southern Theater, and the Middle Theater. Speakers include: Mark Edward Lender, Emeritus Professor of History at Kean University; James Kirby Martin, Charles B. Ewing Visiting Professor of Military History, USMA, West Point; Charles Neimeyer, Director and >>More


October, 2017

Sarah Bennett’s Babies: Years of Sickness


Local authorities, including the Humane Society, considered taking action to alleviate conditions in  John and Sarah Bennett’s home at Hope in Hamilton County. Some believed the Bennett’s three sons were being held captive by their mother, perhaps under a kind of spell.  After checking in on the three Bennett brothers,  Dr. George Peters of Gloversville rendered this assessment: “I have examined George, Ward, and Frank Bennett of Hope, New York, and it is my opinion that if the three young men were taken from their home, or even if they were left at home and placed under the tutorship of >>More


October, 2017

New Book Tells History Of Park’s African-Americans


It’s obvious to anyone who spends time here that the vast majority of people who live in or visit the Adirondack Park are white. This could have consequences for the Forest Preserve, because the Preserve belongs to all New Yorkers and its future is in their hands. The latest census data indicate that about 18 percent of the state’s population is African-American (another 19 percent is Hispanic or Latino). Although few African-Americans live in the Adirondacks, our region is not without its own black history. Most people will think of John Brown’s farm in North Elba and Gerrit Smith’s effort >>More


October, 2017

Lake George History Roundtable Planned


Historians, cultural and environmental groups, museums, and community members are invited to a roundtable discussion that highlights the Lake George region communities and their stories on Friday, November 3, 2017, from 10 am to 3 pm, at the Bolton Historical Museum at 4924 Lake Shore Drive, Bolton Landing. Participants will discuss topics such as the history, photographic collections, and environmental stewardship of the region. Participants will identify what is visible in the landscape related to these topics, the stories of the people, the sites and events to visit, and what resources can be found in libraries and museum collections. Lake >>More


October, 2017

A Short History The Sacandaga Canal Project


With the opening of the entire Erie Canal in 1825, a call for more canals and other internal improvements arose from all over New York State. People in many legislative districts thought that if the state could build a canal that had already shown its great value, it could also provide infrastructure projects to help regional economies to connect with the artificial river that joined the interior Great Lakes and the global market through Albany and New York City. This was also the case coming from the legislative representatives from Montgomery County and although many lateral canals would be subsequently >>More


October, 2017

Postal History of World War One Program in Ticonderoga


The Ticonderoga Historical Society has invited the public to a free program focusing on the Postal Service in World War One, on Friday, November 3 at 7 pm. Featured speaker will be Glenn Estus, President of the Vermont Philatelic Society. As part of the overall support for U.S. Entry into World War One, The United States Post Office Department participated in efforts to help raise funds. One method included cancelling mail with slogans that encouraged Americans to buy Liberty Loans. The United States was not alone in this effort, and this program will also show how allied nations such as >>More


October, 2017

A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War


A companion catalog to the New York State Museum exhibition of the same name, Aaron Noble’s new book A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War (SUNY Press, 2017) documents the statewide story of New York in World War I through the collections of the New York State Museum, Library, and Archives. Within the collections are the nearly 3,600 posters of the Benjamin W. Arnold World War I Poster Collection at the New York State Library. The book interweaves the story of New York in the Great War with some of these posters, and artifacts from >>More


October, 2017

Adirondack Witchcraft? Sarah Bennett’s Babies in Hope, NY


This story is about as bizarre as it gets. Locals in the Wells and Northville area were privy to the odd situation when it first came under public scrutiny a little over a century ago. At that time, a goal of regional counties seeking tourism dollars was providing easier public access to the Adirondacks, which was achieved in part by building new roads and improving old ones. In southeastern Hamilton County, Northville marked the end of rail access in 1910. From there, stage lines carried visitors north through the hamlet of Hope to Wells and beyond. To accommodate automobiles, which >>More


October, 2017

A Great Pumpkin Prank; Pumpkin Production In NYS


McGraw Hall, Cornell University’s first building, is certainly the most recognizable symbol of the University and, arguably, one of the state’s most iconic buildings. Built in 1891 and named for Jennie McGraw, a close family friend of University co-founder, Ezra Cornell. McGraw Hall’s clock tower, which houses the 21-bell Cornell Chimes; played three times a day and heard all over campus, stands 173-feet-tall, with an extremely steep 20-foot-high tiled roof-spire. It holds a commanding presence from vantage points all around the city of Ithaca. So, on the morning of October 8, 1997, Cornell students, faculty, and staff were baffled when they >>More