FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

February, 2018

Susan B. Anthony’s 1855 Winter North Country Adventure


On February 19 our nation celebrates President’s Day to recognize the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln (February 12) and George Washington (February 22). Between these two days is February 15, the anniversary of the birth of another great American, Susan B. Anthony. Although it is not yet a national holiday, Susan B. Anthony Day is a New York State commemorative holiday and places such as Seneca Falls and Rochester, hold grand celebrations. There should be fanfare in the North Country, too. In her youth, Anthony lived in Battenville in Washington County, where her father ran a mill, and Cahajorie, near Johnstown, >>More


February, 2018

Marie Curie Once Visited the North Country


History credits the discovery of uranium to a German chemist, Martin Henrich Klaproth, in 1789. In 1896, just over a century later, a French chemist, Eugene-Melchior Peligot, discovered uranium’s radioactivity.  Uranium ore, known as pitchblende, was revealed shortly after by Marie and Pierre Curie as the source of radium, which they mentioned as a possible future treatment for cancer. Polish born Marie, (her name was Sklowdowska) was the first woman to win a Nobel prize, and the first person to win twice — in 1903, in physics, for her work on radiation, and in 1911, in chemistry, for discovering polonium >>More


February, 2018

Fort Ti War College on the Seven Years’ War


Registration is now open for Fort Ticonderoga’s Twenty-Third Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War May 18-20, 2018. With a panel of distinguished historians from across the United States, this seminar focuses on the Seven Years’ War in North America, also known as the French & Indian War. The War College takes place in the Mars Education Center and is open to the public; pre-registration is required. Begun in 1996, the War College of the Seven Years’ War has become the nation’s premier seminar on the French & Indian War in the United States. It features a mix of >>More


February, 2018

Six-Weeks of World History Set For Grange


Andrew Buchanan, lecturer in global and military history at the University of Vermont, will be presenting on “A History of the World in Six Weeks” at the Whallonsburg Grange on Tuesday, February 13th at 7:30 pm, continuing on subsequent Tuesdays until March 20th. Buchanan will lead lectures on historical events from the origins of human society, transitions in social organization, wars of conquest, technological leaps, as well as the decline and fall of empires. This series will give an introduction to key developments in history. Scheduled lectures include: February 13th: From Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers: The First Great Transition. February 20th: >>More


February, 2018

1775 British Garrison Living History Event at Fort Ti


Fort Ticonderoga has announced a one-day living history event on Saturday, February 17th, looking at British garrison life in February 1775, three months before Ticonderoga was pulled into the American War of Independence. This Living History event will feature the weapons, tactics, trades, and people during peacetime at the fort. Highlighted programming throughout the day brings to life the routine of soldiers in the 26th Foot and their wives and families who made their homes inside Fort Ticonderoga’s barracks. Weapons demonstrations will go beyond loading and firing, and discuss what military traditions remained and what tactical innovations were standard » >>More


February, 2018

A Little North Country Sign Humor


An oldies channel recently played an old favorite of mine from the past: “Signs,” which originated with a Canadian group in 1971, the Five Man Electrical Band. A line of the song called to mind a rather interesting hike from long ago. The second stanza begins with, “And the sign said anybody caught trespassin’ would be shot on sight,” a lyric reminiscent of certain signs that once caused me more than a little consternation. In the late 1970s, while exploring the fringes of a unique natural area in Clinton County, I found myself on a very old, rocky, uneven road >>More


February, 2018

Wanakena Ranger School History Talk Feb 15th


Dr. Michael Bridgen will speak about the Wanakena Ranger School, and the events and figures that formed it at a St. Lawrence County Historical Association Brown Bag Lunch event on Thursday, February 15th, at noon. Since the Wanakena Ranger School was established in 1912, it has trained over 5000 students in forest and environmental technology. Dr. Michael R. Bridgen is the current director of the Ranger School, and has been a faculty member since 1992. His professional training is in forest science and tree physiology and genetics. Prior to teaching at the Ranger School, he served twelve » Continue Reading. >>More


February, 2018

Whiteface Ski History Slideshow in Placid Thursday


The Wilmington Historical Society will present “Whiteface Ski History” at the Lake Placid Olympic Museum, located in the Olympic Center, on Thursday, Feb. 8, at 7 pm. The free presentation will include an overview of Wilmington’s Whiteface Mountain ski area history from the 1940s to the 1980 Olympics. The slide show will explore the ski area’s original site at Marble Mountain, in 1948, and how Whiteface Ski Center became a much larger ski facility when it moved to its current site in 1958. Presenters, Karen Peters, President of the Wilmington Historical Society, and former trustee, Guy Stephenson will discuss how >>More


February, 2018

Soldiers of Color at Fort Ticonderoga Feb 11th


Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” continues on Sunday, February 11, at 2 pm with a program on “Soldiers of Color at Ticonderoga” presented by Stuart Lilie, Vice President of Public History and Operations. This program will focus on the diversity of soldiers who fought at Ticonderoga and examine how attitudes about soldiers of color varied dramatically within the numerous armies and empires that held Ticonderoga. The program is part of the National Black History Month celebration. The great campaigns of the French & Indian War and Revolutionary War have frequently been envisioned with long battle lines of soldiers as equally >>More


February, 2018

Pop Bullock: Notable Beaver River Guide


Monroe H. “Pop” Bullock was born in December 1846 high on the Tug Hill Plateau in Lewis County. He was the son of Hiram and Almeda Bullock who owned a farm just to the west of the village of Worth. Hiram was the son of Leonard Bullock, earliest settler of Worth, who moved to the area in 1802. Hiram’s brother, Leonard Bullock, Jr. owned the farm next door. The crossroad between the two Bullock farms was known as Bullock’s Corners. By 1850 the family had moved into the village of Rodman where Hiram and Almeda operated a boardinghouse. This enterprise >>More




Subscribe

Learn what’s happening this week in the Adirondacks.

    Select the newsletters you would like to receive.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Subscribe to get access to regular information about food and farming in the Adirondacks while supporting our nonprofit newsroom.