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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

January, 2018

Save America’s Treasures Program Seeks Grant Applicants


The National Park Service, in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, is accepting applications for $5 million in matching grants to support the preservation of nationally significant historic properties and collections through the Save America’s Treasures program. Applicants must raise project funds from other sources to match the grant money, which is awarded after a competitive review of project proposals. Eligible projects include the conservation of collections and physical preservation work to historic buildings. All projects must be nationally significant (i.e., listed as National >>More


January, 2018

The Last, Lost Colvin Survey Report of 1898


Along the banks of the Hudson at North River, and further south on highway pull-offs from Route 28, are some of the Adirondack Park’s best interpretive stops. Sturdy, visually appealing and informative exhibits coupled with well-designed DOT parking along the Hudson River have attracted visitors and residents for years to turn off the engine, breathe deeply, eat lunch, listen to the river and learn from the exhibits. At the northernmost pull-off where the Hudson takes the great bend at North River, I recently discovered a new exhibit to precisely match the older ones. Placed there in 2016, it’s sponsored by >>More


January, 2018

Fort Ticonderoga Living History Event Jan 13th


Fort Ticonderoga has planned its next living history event “Preparing for the Coming Campaign,” for Saturday, January 13, 2018. A full day of programs include guided tours, weapons demonstrations, and even a tasting of colonial chocolate along with a program on the importance that this food item played in the lives of American soldiers and camp followers at Ticonderoga. The event hopes to bring to life the story of American soldiers at Ticonderoga in the year 1777 as they prepare for a British attack. Aware that their resources are limited and manpower is scarce, attendees will have » Continue Reading. >>More


January, 2018

Santa Claus Sam’s Adirondack Gift Giving


In 1930, Sam Coplon, the Santa Claus of the Adirondacks, was doing well financially but was by no means wealthy. The house he owned in Brooklyn was worth the equivalent of $230k in 2017, and served as home to his wife Rebecca, son Bertram (13), and daughter Judith (8), along with Rebecca’s mother and sister. As he did each year, Samuel gathered a huge collection of Christmas gifts that winter and personally bore the cost of shipping them to North Creek. In previous seasons, this constituted upwards of 30 large crates or containers, a number that would soon increase. His >>More


December, 2017

Santa Claus Sam’s North Creek Operations


Things appeared to be going well for Sam Coplon, the Santa Claus of the Adirondacks, but major change was in the works. Samuel had begun working as an Albany city clerk, limiting his ability to oversee the two business locations in Warren County. After spending several weeks at Johnsburgh in early 1910, he announced a going-out-of-business sale, offering all the hardware and furniture in his stores along with his horse, rig, and everything else related to operations there. By year’s end, most of the stock was gone. At Christmas time, he loaded a sleigh with toys and other gift items >>More


December, 2017

Lake Champlain Naval History Program At Fort Ti


Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” begins on Sunday, January 7, at 2 pm with “Vigilance and Discipline to be Observed through all the Vessels” presented by Nicholas Spadone, Director of Interpretation. Fort Ticonderoga’s military history in the American Revolution extends well beyond just the land. Strategy and tactics were developed to command Lake Champlain and Lake George. British Royal Navy vessels on Lake Champlain demonstrate the strength and extent needed to attack American-held Ticonderoga as well as supply and defend Ticonderoga during British occupation. This presentation will include the design, construction, and legacy of the British Royal Navy vessels on >>More


December, 2017

Sam Coplon: Santa Claus of the Adirondacks


The collection of letters to Santa that appeared in this space last week epitomized life in the rural regions of northern New York a century ago. At Christmastime, children from families living a common, low-income existence asked Santa for the simplest of items: a pencil and notepad, candy and nuts, or clothing to keep them warm in the winter. Toys and playthings were often secondary requests if they appeared at all. But the simple desires from long ago reflected something other than just poverty. A good number of rural folks were self-sufficient, and all family members, even young children, took >>More


December, 2017

NYS Loses Its Historical Association; Long Had Ties Locally


We recently learned that the New York State Historical Association, which has played a key role in protecting New York’s historic sites and artifacts for more than a century, is now defunct, having officially been absorbed by the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown. It is safe to assume that the museum will not retain the Association’s mission, that of promoting and preserving history throughout New York State. Lake George residents have a special interest in the former Association, in part because it was founded on Lake George in 1899, met annually at the Fort William Henry Hotel and counted residents >>More


December, 2017

2018 Ticonderoga Fort Fever Series Schedule Announced


Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” will begin in January and run through April 2018. The lecture series will be held on Sunday afternoons at 2 pm in the Mars Education Center. Tickets are $12 per person and can be purchased at the door; Fort Ticonderoga Members and Ambassador Pass holders are admitted free of cost. Fort Fever Series Schedule: January 7: “Vigilance and Discipline to be observed through all the Vessels” — Join Assistant Director of Interpretation, Nicholas Spadone, as he explores the composition of the dozens of » Continue Reading. View original post.


December, 2017

North Country Crime and Justice: Adolphus Bouvia’s Murderer


Frank “Pork” Lafave, whom accused murder John Kinney said actually committed the horrific murder of Adolphus Bouvia, testified that he had been in Chazy for two months, a fact confirmed by his hosts, Mr. and Mrs. Eaton. In rebuttal, the defense called William Laforce, an inmate in the county jail. Laforce was facing two charges of horse theft, which may have reduced his credibility as a witness. He claimed that during Frank Lafave’s visit to the jail, Laforce had overheard him admitting the crime and promising revenge on John Kinney for being a snitch. According to Laforce, the comment was, >>More