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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

March, 2018

Profiles Of Old Time Adirondack Fulton Chain Guides


In the past year or so, the Inlet Historical Society received donations of artifacts and materials originating from the collections of Inlet residents. One unique item is the following unidentified newspaper clipping about some notable Fulton Chain guides: Within a few hundred miles of a complex civilization is found the last vestiges of a fast disappearing frontier. Now high-speed, hard-surfaced roadways carry motorists to within a few miles of the heart of what is still the Empire state wilderness, the Adirondacks. And here are still living figures from a past era, the guides of the Adirondacks, as famous in their >>More


March, 2018

Adirondack Uranium: A Lewis County Boondoggle


In late summer 1955, after two months of surveying and studying uranium deposits in Saratoga County, Robert Zullo and his partners, George McDonnell and Lewis Lavery, saw their claims publicly dismissed in print by a business rival, who told the Leader-Herald there were “no major deposits of uranium in the Sacandaga region.” Geologist John Bird of Schenectady had been hired by a Wyoming uranium-mining company to survey the area, and after thirty days, he had found uraninite only in “ridiculously small” quantities. Worse yet, the pegmatites here were different from those in Ontario, he said. Scientifically, the elements within were >>More


March, 2018

St Lawrence Co Klan History Talk March 15th


Author and historian Bryan Thompson will speak on a chapter of the Ku Klux Klan that was active in St. Lawrence County in the 1920s at the next Brown Bag Lunch Series at the St. Lawrence County Historical Association in Canton, NY, on Thursday, March 15th at noon. Local KKK members held rallies and cross burnings in many towns and hamlets in St. Lawrence County, where they targeted communities of African-Americans, Jews, and Catholics. Bryan Thompson, a seventh generation St. Lawrence County native, is the municipal historian for the town of DeKalb. While deputy and town historian, he received the >>More


March, 2018

The Adirondack Uranium Rush (Part 3)


Under the newly formed Mohawk Mining Company (MMC), the trio of George McDonnell, Lewis Lavery, and Robert Zullo had high hopes of successfully developing uranium deposits they discovered near Batchellerville in Saratoga County. Plans were made for radiometric surveys of the sites, and they began pumping water from two feldspar quarries to examine the deeper rock for additional specimens. Tests were also planned on old piles of mine tailings that caused Geiger counters to react. The Albany Times-Union reported that many specimens from the site had “an astonishingly high degree of radioactivity,” and that “The State Geological Survey and the >>More


February, 2018

Adirondack Rush of ’49: Searching For Uranium


After the big news of a possible uranium ore bed near Plattsburgh failed to pan out in early 1949, the search for ore continued locally and nationally. Many magazines, including Life (“The Uranium Rush”) and Popular Mechanics (“The ’49 Uranium Rush”) featured stories on the phenomenon that was sweeping the country. The coincidence of timing — the 100th anniversary of the 1849 California gold rush — made for enticing newspaper headlines as well. No finds in New York appeared likely to pan out until spring 1954, when 34 notices of discovery were filed on more than a thousand acres of >>More


February, 2018

Resistance: Ron Stafford’s Gift to Local Governments


Having spent more than a decade as an aide to an upstate New York senator, the late Ron Stafford, I retain some residual habits, one of which is flipping through the Governor’s budget proposals as soon as they’re released, alert, I would hope, to anything that might have an impact on our region, positive or negative. That’s how I happened to become aware of a proposal in this year’s budget to remove Forest Preserve lands from the real property tax standard and authorize New York State to send Adirondack » Continue Reading. View original post.


February, 2018

Sarah Pell’s Struggle for History, Human Rights


Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” continues on Sunday, March 11, at 2 pm with a program on “A ‘Charmingly Aggressive Woman’: Sarah Pell’s Struggle for History & Human Rights” presented by Miranda Peters, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Collections. This program will explore images, archival materials, and collections never before seen by the public, and recently cataloged by museum staff that reveal glimpses of Sarah Pell’s life and work. This program is part of the National Women’s History Month celebration. Described by a contemporary as a “charmingly aggressive woman,” most early newspapers identified Sarah Pell as a » Continue Reading. View >>More


February, 2018

An Adirondack Uranium Rush


It’s hard not to think the above title is ridiculous. Believable possibilities would be iron, feldspar, talc, or garnet. But uranium? And on top of that, a rush? With the excitement of hopeful lottery players, folks in the past have swarmed the mountains and lowlands at word of supposed gold discoveries, or silver, or other metals, all of them precious in terms of financial value to the finder. But rushing to find radioactive materials — the stronger the better — in the Adirondacks? Really? For the first four decades of the twentieth century, large mines at a few locations worldwide >>More


February, 2018

Naming the Lakes of the Eckford Chain


In the summer of 2017 the League of Extraordinary Adirondack Gentlemen (LEAG) held their annual camp-out at Great Camp Santanoni on Newcomb Lake. I met there, for the first time, a gentleman new to the group. As a result of this meeting, he and I decided to expand our friendship and paddle the Eckford Chain: Raquette, Utowana, Eagle, and Blue Mountain lakes. We set out one fine August morning from Raquette Lake, crossed the lake, and proceeded up the Marion River, through the carry, putting back in at the Utowana dock, continuing through Utowana Lake into Eagle Lake, and then >>More


February, 2018

Pete Nelson: Let’s Do a Landa!


Last summer my wife Amy and I took a trip to Norway.  During part of our trip we camped at Lysefjord, famous for its sheer cliffs including Preikestolen, about which I wrote previously.  Lots of Norwegians and visitors from other European countries car camp as their preferred mode of tourism, meaning those facilities see a brisk business. Preikestolen is one of Norway’s most famous destinations, so we were glad to catch a spot at the nearby campground.  It was well-run, with charming Dutch hosts, and we were quite happy with our stay.  But by late morning of our departure our >>More