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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

March, 2019

Inez Milholland Subject of Ti Historical’s ‘Big Read’


The Ticonderoga Historical Society has invited readers across the region to a “big read” style project focusing on the life of famed suffragist and Adirondack resident Inez Milholland. The program is part of its ongoing programming related to the anniversary of women’s suffrage. The book of focus will be Inez: The Life and Times of Inez Milholland, a 2016 biography by Linda J. Lumsden. The book provides insight into the life – and untimely death of Milholland. The project will kick off on April 15, with e-mail and Facebook updates and discussions. An in-person discussion group will be held at >>More


March, 2019

Naj Wikoff: The Healing Powers of Nature


Is being out in Nature healing? An increasing body of evidence says yes according to Florence Williams, the author of The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes US Happier, Healthier, and More Creative. What makes us happy? For a long time, research has pointed to having good relationships, being engaged with one’s community, meeting one’s basic needs of food, housing, and income, getting exercise, and being involved in some cause more significant than one’s self; spending time helping others. But what about the environment we live in, does that matter, and if so, does it matter in some significant way? To >>More


March, 2019

1921: Rhoda Fox Graves Runs For Assembly


Rhoda Graves was active in Republican politics in 1917 when New York passed women’s suffrage. When it became the law of the land in 1920, it made the possibility of holding elective office an attractive option for some women. In 1921, Rhoda’s close friend, ten-year assemblyman Frank Seaker, retired from public office, and William Laidlaw, nominated to replace him, served for the next three years. It’s not clear what the machinations were behind Laidlaw’s decision not to run for another term, but there’s no doubt the big announcement that followed was the work of Rhoda, Perle (her husband), Frank Seaker, >>More


March, 2019

A New History of Adirondack Native People


Melissa Otis’s book Rural Indigenousness: A History of Iroquoian and Algonquian Peoples of the Adirondacks (Syracuse University Press, 2018) takes a look at indigenous and settler interactions in the Adirondacks. The Adirondacks have been a homeland for Indigenous people for millennia. The presence of Native people in the region was obvious, but not well documented by Europeans who did not venture into the interior between the seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries. Otis’s Rural Indigenousness is a more comprehensive study of the relationship between Native Americans and the Adirondacks than we have seen to date. It shines a light on the >>More


March, 2019

Lake George Rev War Remains: The 1st Pennsylvania At Fort George


The remains dislodged from an 18th century military cemetery at a Lake George construction site will, in all likelihood, be reinterred on the grounds of Fort George Park, say Village officials. The Village’s Board of Trustees has adopted a resolution calling upon New York State to permit the remains to be buried at the state-owned park, said Mayor Bob Blais. Blais said New York State officials support the proposal, although the remains will be in the possession of state archaeologists for at least a year, undergoing examination and analyses. Mike Borgos, an attorney for Ruben and Dana Ellsworth, who were >>More


March, 2019

A Soldier’s Journey Through The Adirondack Park


, featuring seven events that look deeper into Adirondack history and culture. The next Adirondack Experience 2019 Cabin Fever Sunday Series lecture will be “A Soldier’s Journey through the Heart of the Park” with John Taibi on March 24th. John Taibi shares the story of a Second World War soldier who was held captive as a prisoner-of-war by the German Army. Upon arriving home, he was reunited with his wife of hardly a year, and the United States Army sent them both to The Club in Lake Placid for rest and relaxation following his P.O.W. deprivations and her constant worry >>More


March, 2019

Comments Sought on Crown Point Management Plan


The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Office of Parks Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) are preparing a Unit Management Plan (UMP) for both the Crown Point State Historic Site and the Crown Point Campground and Day Use Area. Public comments are sought on the UMP, which will address the future management of both properties, including 440-acres along the shores of Lake Champlain. A public meeting to start the planning process will be held on Thursday, March 28, at 6 pm in the auditorium of the Crown Point State Historic Site Museum, 21 Grandview Drive, >>More


March, 2019

Gouverneur’s Rhoda Fox Graves, NYS Political Trailblazer


Bucking the odds is a common theme of Walter-Mitty-type fantasies — overcoming daunting obstacles to become a winner, or a hero at some level. Few of us actually live the dream, but sometimes it happens, and during Women’s History Month, an incredible North Country example comes to mind: Rhoda F. Graves of Gouverneur in St. Lawrence County. The extreme unlikelihood of her becoming a historic figure in state politics makes her story all the more compelling. And the details are amazing. Extreme unlikelihood? Well, consider that for the first two-thirds of her life, the groundbreaking events of the final third >>More


March, 2019

The Other Milhollands: John and Vida


In celebration of Women’s History Month, the Warren County Historical Society will host “The Other Milhollands: John and Vida” on Wednesday, March 27, at 7 pm in Glens Falls. Managing Director of the Ticonderoga Historical Society Diane O’Connor will be the presenter. John E. Milholland, born in 1860, was a journalist, politician, inventor and publisher, who helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He was an owner of the Ticonderoga Sentinel newspaper and a key progressive figure of the early 1900s. Vida Milholland was born in 1888 and, while not as well-known as her sister, >>More


March, 2019

Remembering Jackie Archer: A North Country Inspiration (Conclusion)


At Plattsburgh’s Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Celebration in 1990, Chairperson Vivian Papson shared a personal recollection of Jackie Archer with the Press-Republican’s Anne Smith: “The first time I made contact with Jackie was in 1987. My introduction to her was a firm yet musical voice on the phone saying, ‘I’m Jacqueline Archer. I live in Plattsburgh and I think that this community needs to have a way to celebrate Dr. King’s birthday. I would like to organize a commemorative gathering; would you be interested in working with me?’ Everyone is very proud of Jackie. She is confined >>More