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Archive for the ‘history’ Category

April, 2019

Gouverneur’s Rhoda Fox Graves, NYS Political Trailblazer (Conclusion)


The Ogdensburg Journal-Republican, forced to eat crow after rejecting Rhoda Graves’ claims of Warren Thayer’s corruption, applied twisted logic to justify their stance and the senator’s behavior. They opened with: “Senator Thayer has retired…. It was found that he was on the payroll of a utility corporation and, we feel, working against the interests of the average resident of this district who has been forced to pay unjust rates.” The words “we feel” simply did not apply. There was no question he had been putting the financial screws to his voters while protecting a power company and lining his own >>More


April, 2019

Rhoda Fox Graves, NYS Political Trailblazer (Part 4)


During Rhoda Fox’s efforts on behalf of the Republican Party from 1918 through 1923, there was plenty of praise for her in the media and no criticism, but she was a non-office holder. When she decided in 1924 to run for an Assembly seat, anti-woman resistance was evident, gently discouraging the idea by praising her activism but insisting the job was best done by a man. When she surprised most people and won, the anti-woman factions maintained their stance but were forced to grudgingly accepted her. Now, with the announcement of a run for the Senate, the kid gloves were >>More


April, 2019

John Brown Lives! Awarded Grant by Parks & Trails


John Brown Lives! (JBL!) has been awarded a $31,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Fund’s (EPF) Park and Trail Partnership Program to enhance interpretation at the John Brown Farm and to develop outreach strategies that raise awareness of and support of the site. JBL! became the official Friends Group of the John Brown Farm State Historic Site in Lake Placid in 2016. “Our goal is to elevate the John Brown Farm from a ‘best kept secret’ to a must-visit site,” said Martha Swan, Executive Director of JBL!, in an announcement sent to the press.  “We want the Farm to be >>More


March, 2019

Gouverneur’s Rhoda Fox Graves, NYS Political Trailblazer (Part 3)


After a year in office, Rhoda Graves won reelection to the New York State Assembly, while five other female GOP candidates elsewhere in the state lost. In January 1926, she sought the chairmanship of the social welfare committee, a position already held by a senior member (from Niagara) who was unwilling to surrender it. She was instead given charge of public institutions — not her preference, for sure — but chairing any committee was another historic first for New York women. Rhoda’s second year in office was an active one. She pushed a bill restricting the slaughter of tubercular cows >>More


March, 2019

Lecture: William Murray’s Impact on Adirondack Tourism


The final Cabin Fever Sunday Series program of the season at Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX) will be Fools Rushed In: W.H.H. Murray’s Adventures in the Wilderness, 150 Years Later with Ivy Gocker, is set for April 7th, at 1:30 pm. In 1869, Boston-based clergyman and author William Henry Harrison Murray published a collection of advice and anecdotes on his camping trips to a then little-visited region – the Adirondacks.  Adventures in the Wilderness; or, Camp-Life in the Adirondacks would launch a thousand camping trips, inspiring hordes of untested city folk to try their hand at >>More


March, 2019

Inez Milholland Subject of Ti Historical’s ‘Big Read’


The Ticonderoga Historical Society has invited readers across the region to a “big read” style project focusing on the life of famed suffragist and Adirondack resident Inez Milholland. The program is part of its ongoing programming related to the anniversary of women’s suffrage. The book of focus will be Inez: The Life and Times of Inez Milholland, a 2016 biography by Linda J. Lumsden. The book provides insight into the life – and untimely death of Milholland. The project will kick off on April 15, with e-mail and Facebook updates and discussions. An in-person discussion group will be held at >>More


March, 2019

Naj Wikoff: The Healing Powers of Nature


Is being out in Nature healing? An increasing body of evidence says yes according to Florence Williams, the author of The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes US Happier, Healthier, and More Creative. What makes us happy? For a long time, research has pointed to having good relationships, being engaged with one’s community, meeting one’s basic needs of food, housing, and income, getting exercise, and being involved in some cause more significant than one’s self; spending time helping others. But what about the environment we live in, does that matter, and if so, does it matter in some significant way? To >>More


March, 2019

1921: Rhoda Fox Graves Runs For Assembly


Rhoda Graves was active in Republican politics in 1917 when New York passed women’s suffrage. When it became the law of the land in 1920, it made the possibility of holding elective office an attractive option for some women. In 1921, Rhoda’s close friend, ten-year assemblyman Frank Seaker, retired from public office, and William Laidlaw, nominated to replace him, served for the next three years. It’s not clear what the machinations were behind Laidlaw’s decision not to run for another term, but there’s no doubt the big announcement that followed was the work of Rhoda, Perle (her husband), Frank Seaker, >>More


March, 2019

A New History of Adirondack Native People


Melissa Otis’s book Rural Indigenousness: A History of Iroquoian and Algonquian Peoples of the Adirondacks (Syracuse University Press, 2018) takes a look at indigenous and settler interactions in the Adirondacks. The Adirondacks have been a homeland for Indigenous people for millennia. The presence of Native people in the region was obvious, but not well documented by Europeans who did not venture into the interior between the seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries. Otis’s Rural Indigenousness is a more comprehensive study of the relationship between Native Americans and the Adirondacks than we have seen to date. It shines a light on the >>More


March, 2019

Lake George Rev War Remains: The 1st Pennsylvania At Fort George


The remains dislodged from an 18th century military cemetery at a Lake George construction site will, in all likelihood, be reinterred on the grounds of Fort George Park, say Village officials. The Village’s Board of Trustees has adopted a resolution calling upon New York State to permit the remains to be buried at the state-owned park, said Mayor Bob Blais. Blais said New York State officials support the proposal, although the remains will be in the possession of state archaeologists for at least a year, undergoing examination and analyses. Mike Borgos, an attorney for Ruben and Dana Ellsworth, who were >>More




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