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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

August, 2018

Organic Farming Field Day in Keeseville


The Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York (NOFA-NY) is set to hold an on-farm field day at Fledging Crow Farm in Keeseville on Wednesday, August 15, from 1:30 to 4:30 pm. Farmer Ian Ater and NOFA-NY Vegetable Coordinator Maryellen Sheehan will lead a farm tour and field walk, with a focus on implementation of food safety practices. Ater will demonstrate the steps of a root harvest day – including pulling, topping, washing, and packing – with an eye towards increased efficiency. The field day will then continue on to the nearby Ausable Brewing Company, for further workshops and farmer-to-farmer >>More


July, 2018

Riverfront Arts Fest In Warrensburgh Friday


An Adirondack Riverfront Arts Festival will take place Friday, July 27 from 3 to 6 pm at the Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers’ Market, down by the river on State Route 418. There will be demonstrations and sales of “Made in the Adirondacks” hand-crafted work. Demonstrations will include blacksmithing, rustic furniture building, paper bead making, basketry, jewelry design, spinning, painting, and more. Visitors can learn the processes used to make healing soaps and lotions and the benefits of essential oils from Darlene Gregson; visit with local author Pat Leonard who will be personalizing her books; observe the technique of Kaena Peterson as >>More


July, 2018

Richard Gast: Scream for Ice Cream


You know it’s hot outside when you stop by a friend’s home on the 4th of July, he’s got a growler of Township 7 Raspberry Haze ale and a half-gallon of Stewart’s butter pecan ice-cream on the kitchen counter, and he’s making himself a craft-beer float. “Try one!” he said. Let’s just say it’s an acquired taste. But it made me think that something similar may have been the inspiration for Butterbeer, the brisk, inebriating beverage enjoyed by the characters in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter novels. So, I asked him what the inspiration for his craft-beer float was and he >>More


July, 2018

Food Preservation Series in Warrensburg


Cornell Cooperative Extension of Warren County is set to host a Food Preservation Series which will include making jams and jellies, and salsa, and address fermentation and pickling, and making jerky. Jam and Jelly Making will be held on August 5th from 1:30 to 4 pm. This class will cover food safety skills (a must when preserving food), and several methods of jam and jelly making. Each participant will bring home a jar of jam or jelly. Cost is $15. Salsa Making will be held on August 19th from 1:30 to 4 pm. During this interactive class, participants will make >>More


July, 2018

Local Agriculture: Prairie’s Orchard


When Dan and Brandyn Prairie purchased their home on County Route 24 (the Brainardsville Rd), Malone in 2013, Dan really wanted to utilize the open field behind their home to grow a crop. After a lot of thought, he ended up narrowing his choices down to either planting a vineyard or an apple orchard. Dan eventually settled on growing apples, not only because of their profitability potential but also because it would be something the family enjoyed doing together. In the spring of 2014, Prairie’s Orchard was established with the planting of sixty Macintosh and sixty Honey Crisp trees. Since >>More


July, 2018

2018 Bike the Barns Event Announced


The 2018 Bike the Barns, a one-day recreational bicycle tour that showcases the local food and agriculture movement in northern New York, has been set for Sunday, September 30th. The third annual farm-by-bike event, hosted by the Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA), will begin and end at Asgaard Farm & Dairy in Au Sable Forks. This year’s tour offers four new route options of approximately 13, 25, 45 and 75 miles to suit individual riders’ abilities and preferences. The routes will also feature seven new farm stops, where riders will have the opportunity to engage » Continue Reading. View original >>More


June, 2018

Adirondack Farmers’ Markets Open for the Season


Farmers’ markets have existed as a part of American society, business, and trade since 1634, when the first farmers’ market in the new world opened for business in Boston, Massachusetts. And throughout much of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, outdoor market places were vital centers of commerce in both American cities and rural communities. The Central Market, in Lancaster Pennsylvania, has been held in the same location since 1730. George Washington wrote about sending his kitchen staff to shop at Philadelphia’s outdoor market during the 1790s. And Thomas Jefferson wrote, in 1806, about buying beef, eggs and vegetables at >>More


June, 2018

Babbie Rural and Farm Learning Museum’s Homestead Festival


Thankfully, there are a number of opportunities for all of us to learn about and have access to locally produced products. Farmers Markets are opening for the season. Farm tours are available and pollinator workshops continue to put the importance of locally grown food in the forefront. I’ve always wanted my children to not only see the important role local food plays in our life and economy, but to see how other skills and crafts evolved in the Adirondacks and beyond. Since I don’t want everything to always be a lesson, one fun way to learn about the past and >>More


June, 2018

Native Foods: Chugging Chaga at Tea-Time


Ingredients for healthy beverages are free for the taking outdoors if you can get past the introduction stage. Hemlock tea, one of my favorites, is a good example. This is not the recipe poor Socrates used, which was made with the toxic perennial herb, poison-hemlock. The kind I serve is a vitamin-C-rich infusion of needles and young shoots from the stately eastern hemlock tree, Tsuga canadensis. This hemlock tea is great with a touch of honey, and the good part is that you can drink it more than once. Plus it’s fun to see the reaction when I offer it >>More


May, 2018

High Peaks Happy Hour: Bolton Landing Brewing Co.


It isn’t often a brewery is borne of a desire to live in a particular location. In most instances, a long-time home brewer’s obsession propels him or her to that outcome. Not so for Brendan Murnane of Bolton Landing Brewing Company. He knew where he wanted to live. His quandary was finding a way to make a living. Oh, and he’s never really made beer, except in a class once. So naturally he decided to open a brewery. Brendan, who is from Westchester County, has spent summers in Bolton Landing with his family since 1988 and wanted to find a >>More