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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

January, 2014

On Old Beer Cans: Artifacts Of The Trail


Yesterday I skied to Burntbridge Pond deep in the Cranberry Lake Wild Forest. About four miles from the road I came across a historical artifact: an old Black Label can hanging from a branch. It reminded me of a humorous essay by Mike Jarboe, “Happiness in a can,” that we published in the Adirondack Explorer in 2000. Mike wrote about scavenging for old beer cans at a dump below Death Falls near Raquette Lake. “Ah, nature: the crisp, invigorating Adirondack air, the sound of Death Falls roaring behind us, and mounds of 40-year-old Utica Club and Carling’s Black Label cans,” >>More


January, 2014

On Old Beer Cans: Artifacts Of The Trail


On Thursday I skied to Burntbridge Pond deep in the Cranberry Lake Wild Forest. About four miles from the road I came across a historical artifact: an old Black Label can hanging from a branch. It reminded me of a humorous essay by Mike Jarboe, “Happiness in a can,” that we published in the Adirondack Explorer in 2000. Mike wrote about scavenging for old beer cans at a dump below Death Falls near Raquette Lake. “Ah, nature: the crisp, invigorating Adirondack air, the sound of Death Falls roaring behind us, and mounds of 40-year-old Utica Club and Carling’s Black Label >>More


January, 2014

Cabin Life: The Brown Eggs


Well, the low temperature last night was still above zero for the first time in a week.  It’s not much, but it’s something to look forward to.  And then tomorrow they’re saying that the highs will be above freezing.  It has been a wild winter so far, weather-wise. While the rest of the nation was experiencing record cold last week, we were watching the snow melt and the ruts in the driveway disappear.  Then we had bone chilling cold with nasty wind.  So much so that if I didn’t check the chicken coop every hour or so for eggs, the >>More


January, 2014

Cabin Life: The Brown Eggs


Well, the low temperature last night was still above zero for the first time in a week.  It’s not much, but it’s something to look forward to.  And then tomorrow they’re saying that the highs will be above freezing.  It has been a wild winter so far, weather-wise. While the rest of the nation was experiencing record cold last week, we were watching the snow melt and the ruts in the driveway disappear.  Then we had bone chilling cold with nasty wind.  So much so that if I didn’t check the chicken coop every hour or so for eggs, the >>More


January, 2014

Local Farm Economics: Are You Paid What You’re Worth?


I have often said that I am blessed because I get paid to do something I love.  And I often put in more hours in my week than I get paid for in my pay check, but it is a balance.  I also for the most part set my own schedule.  Of course we have set office hours, and I have a desk and a chair I am supposed to be in during the work week.  But I also have meetings and consultations outside those office walls.  Because of my job, I have gotten to travel to places I probably >>More


January, 2014

Local Meat and Community Freezer Space


Shared community freezer space may prove to be a boon to farmers selling meat in bulk quantities and consumers seeking an economical way to purchase and store local meat. The local food movement is still going strong here in the North Country. During the winter months we tend to be focused less on the fresh fruits and vegetables and more on the products we can access out of season: honey, maple, dairy, eggs, storage crops, value-added items like jams and mustards, and especially locally-raised meats. We have many Northern New York farmers raising beef, poultry, pork, bison, lamb, goat, and >>More


December, 2013

Dan Crane: The Edible Adirondacks


Spending time in the Adirondack backcountry requires an entire menagerie of skills, including navigation, endurance and tolerance for being the object of affection for hordes of bloodthirsty flies. Often overlooked are those skills necessary to survive in the wilderness for an extended period without all the convenient gear and compact foods typically carried by most backcountry enthusiasts. These skills include, but are certainly not limited to, building a shelter, starting a fire and finding something to eat. Although these skills are useful when impressing members of the opposite sex far from civilization, these skills just might mean the difference between >>More


December, 2013

Adirondack Brewery Graphics Will Honor Locals


Adirondack Brewery, the micro-brewery based in Lake George, will be honoring the Adirondacks by featuring local outdoor enthusiasts on their new 12-pack case graphics. Dubbed  “Adirondack Challengers,” the new Fall and Winter Mix collections feature sports enthusiasts dedicated to challenging the forces of nature in the Adirondacks. “The Brewery has always wrapped its image with tales and stories about Adirondack history,” Creative Director Linda Wohlers said in a statement ot the press. “Now, we are fast-forwarding into the present to celebrate actual people who have a passion for getting out into the mountains and on the rivers to challenge mother-nature. >>More


December, 2013

Cabin Life: The First Eggs


Yesterday morning, I let the chickens out into their run, just like I always do.  I sprinkled some food in there and gave them my customary “Hey Ladies!”  I’ve stopped trying to keep them in the run, as they seem to get out now whenever they feel like it. Even so, I closed the plastic over the opening in the run, and went back inside to have some tea.  Whitey is far and away my most vocal chicken, and she was squawking up a storm.  I looked out to see her relentlessly attacking the plastic covering the opening, and as >>More


December, 2013

After I Pick the Fruit: The Lives of Migrant Women


A large percentage of the farm workers who harvest New York State’s apples, potatoes, onions, and other fruits and vegetables are immigrants working long hours with no overtime pay, few benefits, low salaries, often substandard housing, and no right to collective bargaining, as those rights fought for over fifty years ago in California by Cesar Chavez were excluded from being applied here. Illegal immigrants comprise approximately five percent of this workforce. After I Pick the Fruit: The Lives of Migrant Women is a documentary filmed by Nancy Ghertner that follows five immigrant women and their families over a ten-year period >>More




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