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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘development’ Category

June, 2019

Short-Term Population Loss in the Adirondacks and Rural America


One way to dig deeper into the population dynamics at play in the Adirondack Park is to examine short-term population changes. The last article in this series looked long-term at total population rates where from 1970 to 2010 Adirondack communities grew at 10.6%, a rate that exceeded the 6.2% rate of New York State in these years. In our report The Adirondack Park and Rural America: Economic and Population Trends 1970-2010 we examined population trends in a number of ways. One of the most interesting was our analysis of short-term changes in total population of Adirondack communities from 2000 to >>More


June, 2019

EV Chargers Now in Keene; Plans Floated for Marcy Field, Route 73


Two Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations have been installed on the Route 73 corridor: one in the hamlet of Keene, the other in Keene Valley. Both are easy to use and have industry standard Level 2 chargers that support virtually any EV on the road today – users need only to plug in. There is a donation box at each charger to cover electricity costs. The requested donation is about the equivalent of $1.00 per gallon of gasoline. The charging stations were organized by the Town of Keene and the Keene Clean Energy Team (KCET) and made possible by a >>More


June, 2019

Court Blocks Bridge Over River Designated Scenic


New York Supreme Court Judge Robert Muller issued a temporary restraining order on Friday blocking the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation from constructing a new 140-foot steel motor vehicle bridge over the Cedar River. DEC wants to build the bridge to create a shorter snowmobile route between Indian Lake and Newcomb.  The planned route also requires a second legally questionable bridge across the Boreas River, also designated  Scenic, as well as permissions from numerous land owners. The restraining order was issued in response to a lawsuit brought in January by Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve and Protect the >>More


June, 2019

Population Trends in the Adirondacks and Rural America


The first major population indicator that was examined in The Adirondack Park and Rural America: Economic and Population Trends 1970-2010 was changes in total population. Population growth or loss is a key indicator for measuring community and regional vitality. From 1970 to 2010, the overall U.S. population increased by nearly 52%, from 201.2 million to over 305.6 million people. In these years, New York State experienced a modest 6.2% increase, growing from 18.2 million to 19.3 million, a rate of growth that lagged far behind national growth. In this report we aggregated the data of the 61 Adirondack Park Towns >>More


June, 2019

51,000 Acres, Rights Acquired in Raquette Boreal Forest Area


The Conservation Fund, a national nonprofit, has announced it has acquired ownership and rights on roughly 51,300 total acres in the Northwestern Adirondack Park. The Three Rivers Forest properties include exceptional northern hardwood timberland near the headwaters of a three major rivers flowing north to the St. Lawrence River – the Raquette, Oswegatchie and Grasse. The lands were purchased from investor-owners who had previously purchased former paper company lands, including former tracts of the Champion and International paper companies. Adirondack Council Executive Director Wille Janeway said this area includes some sensitive forests adjoining the Raquette Boreal Primitive Area, and is >>More


June, 2019

40 Years of Self-Employment Trends in the Adirondacks and Rural America


The fifth major economic indicator examined in The Adirondack Park and Rural America: Economic and Population Trends 1970-2010 was changes in the self-employment rate. In 2010, the self-employment rate of the population 16 years and older in New York State stood at 5.6%, which was the same as the rate in the U.S. The U.S. Census tracks self-employment rates of the population that are incorporated and those that are non-incorporated. This study focused on the non-incorporated because the data was available going back to 1970. In this report we aggregated the data of the 61 Adirondack Park Towns that are >>More


June, 2019

Did Her Independence Sink APA Acting Chair Feldman?


Having been nominated and confirmed to the NYS Adirondack Park Agency five years earlier, Karen Feldman was named by Governor Cuomo as APA’s acting chair following the resignation of Sherman Craig in summer 2018. In Ms. Feldman the Governor had an experienced board member chairing APA and one interested in continuing on as permanent chair of the eleven-member board. Ms. Feldman appeared energetic, communicative with board, staff and the public, engaged in APA matters, politically astute and well connected. She seemed prepared and ready to lead. One would think she would be a shoe-in to be named APA chair at >>More


June, 2019

DEC Releases Oswegatchie Conservation Easement Plans


The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced the release of a Recreation Management Plan (RMP) for the Oswegatchie Conservation Easement (CE). The Oswegatchie CE encompasses approximately 16,929 acres in the towns of Croghan and Diana in Lewis County, including more than 14,000 acres within the Adirondack Park. The property surrounds 3.5 miles of the Middle Branch of the Oswegatchie River, shares 9.6 miles of boundary with forest preserve lands, and one mile of boundary with state forest land. The Oswegatchie CE is primarily accessed from Bald Mountain Road, leading north from Long Pond Road in the >>More


June, 2019

2,400-Acre Eagle Mountain Preserve Established


An expanse of 2,434 acres of Adirondack foothills at the headwaters of the Boquet River, including streams, ponds, and mature forest, has been protected. The new Eagle Mountain Wilderness Preserve part of a large, intact forest that connects the High Peaks to lower elevation lands near Lake Champlain. Surrounding protected areas include New York State’s Jay Mountain Wilderness and Taylor Pond Wild Forest (home to the local landmark, Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain), as well as other privately conserved lands. Partnering with Northeast Wilderness Trust, Adirondack Land Trust will hold a conservation easement on the property, and will be responsible for ensuring that >>More


June, 2019

40 Years of Per Capita Income Trends in Rural America


The second major economic indicator that was examined in The Adirondack Park and Rural America: Economic and Population Trends 1970-2010 was per capita income. An analysis of per capita income trends was useful for evaluating differences between regions, especially when analyzed with a range of other economic indicators. Per capita income is the average income earned of a person within a specific geographic area, such as a city, town or state. When adjusted for inflation, per capita income is an important measurement, though not as good as median household income, because it can be skewed by a few individuals with >>More