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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘development’ Category

February, 2018

Comments Sought On St. Lawrence Rock Ridge Plans


The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced they are seeking public input on the draft St. Lawrence Rock Ridge Unit Management Plan (UMP). Located just outside the Adirondack Park, the 21,542-acre St. Lawrence Rock Ridge planning unit consists of fifteen (15) state forests, and nine (9) detached forest preserve parcels and is in a broad area of southwestern St. Lawrence County and northeastern Lewis County. The detached Forest Preserve parcels are in the town of DeKalb, Depeyster, Gouverneur, and Pitcairn in St. Lawrence County and the town of Diana in Lewis County. The State Forests included >>More


February, 2018

APA Decision Leaves Road To Boreas Ponds


The Adirondack Park Agency today approved the Boreas Ponds as the state’s newest Wilderness lands in the Adirondack Forest Preserve. The APA approved the classification of 11,400 acres around Boreas Ponds, and nearly 15,000 acres of other lands bordering the High Peaks as Wilderness. Public motor vehicle use could be as close as ¼ mile to the shoreline of Boreas Ponds. Under this classification, the Gulf Brook Road may be retained as a Forest Preserve road open to bicycles and motor vehicles and used as a snowmobile trail. The Wilderness area around the Boreas Ponds limits public uses to canoes, >>More


February, 2018

Bill Ingersoll: Boreas Ponds Plan Process Manipulated


The buzz this week, of course, is the announcement of the state’s planned classification of the Boreas Ponds. This news came roughly ten years after we learned that the state intended to purchase this tract for the Forest Preserve, and fifteen months after the Adirondack Park Agency kicked off its formal procedure to classify the land according to the guidelines of the State Land Master Plan. My neck is still sore from the whiplash I experienced late last week when I first heard the news. It wasn’t the classification decision itself that did it, because my first reaction to the >>More


January, 2018

Willie Janeway On ORDA Facility Upgrades


The State Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA) is accepting comments on a major and much needed multi-million dollar upgrade to its facilities in the Adirondack and Catskill Parks. In particular, ORDA is proposing multiple improvements at Whiteface and Gore Mountain Ski Centers through amendments to each facility’s Unit Management Plan (UMP). Proposed improvements include the addition or replacement of ski lifts, widening of trails, creation of new trails, and re-classification of Forest Preserve lands. While these improvements appear to be needed to modernize the ORDA recreational facilities, they must to be legal and demonstrate responsible environmental stewardship. The public can >>More


January, 2018

Gibson: Proposal for Boreas Ponds Falls Short


One could almost hear the exhalation of relief by environmentalists when they learned this week that the Governor’s DEC and APA had decided on “Alternative 2 B” for the Boreas Ponds State Land classification. Large, obvious violations of law were to be avoided, so they learned. Fears held over the past year were apparently allayed. There would be no unclassified area reserved for a future glamorous camping (“glamping”) in the interior, and no bicycle route on vanishing old roads cloaked by balsam fir leading north towards White Lily Pond and the High Peaks Wilderness. Under “2B” the Boreas Ponds » >>More


January, 2018

Bauer: Making The Boreas Ponds Compromise


News about the state’s decision on the classification of the 21,000-acre Boreas Ponds tract, part of a larger 54,000-acre classification package released by the Adirondack Park Agency (APA), has been met with a spectrum of cheers and some jeers. The decision is clearly a compromise, and as with any good compromise there was give and take, with things in it that people both support and oppose. As we evaluate this historic turn of events in the days before the APA takes up deliberations on February 1st and 2nd, it’s worth taking stock of the making of this compromise. As a >>More


January, 2018

APA Offers Boreas Ponds Tract Proposals


The Adirondack Park Agency has released its official proposal for the classification of the 20,543-acre Boreas Ponds Tract. The Agency will take up this decision at its meeting on February 1-2 in Ray Brook. The Agency held public hearings at the end of 2016 and deliberated internally over a variety of management options for more than a year. The Agency staff is recommending Alternative 2B as its preferred option, which uses an area 1/8 of a mile north of the Gulf Brook Road as the Wilderness and Wild Forest Boundary. All lands north will be » Continue Reading. View original >>More


January, 2018

Beyond Boreas: Other Classification Decisions to Watch


The Boreas Track is just one part of the proposed classification or reclassification of 54,418 acres of State Lands in the Adirondack Park. The Governor’s Adirondack Park Agency drafted a set of amendments to the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan (SLMP) that included some 100 other proposed classifications, reclassifications, and/or map corrections as part of a large Appendix A of the draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS). While most of the attention to date has been focused on the high profile 20,543 acre Boreas Ponds Tract, APA watchers expect the Agency to soon release the proposed final set of >>More


January, 2018

State’s Frontier Town Plan Missing Key Transportation Piece


Last Thursday the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) approved New York State’s plan to build a 91-site camping, equestrian and day use area at the site of the former Frontier Town in North Hudson. This is the first part of a multi-part strategy to develop the entire site into a gateway with a mix of private and public amenities, businesses and recreational assets. The overall plan is spelled out in the Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC’s) Upper Hudson Recreation Hub Master Plan. Note the word “Hub:” the DEC and the organizations involved in planning the project understand that the Frontier Town >>More


January, 2018

Rail Or Trail: Warren County Weighs Options


The time may have come for Warren County to retire from the railroad business, says Ron Conover, the chairman of the Board of Supervisors. In his annual message to the board, Conover broached the possibility of replacing the rail line between Stony Creek and North River, which the County owns and currently leases to Iowa-Pacific’s tourist train, with a multi-use recreational trail. “I think the prudent thing at this stage is to begin to investigate whether a recreational trail should be created, by whom, at what cost, for which users; we should also ask how to pay for » Continue >>More




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