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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Adirondacks’ Category

May, 2019

Life, Death, and Black Flies


I was in southern Connecticut a few weeks back to pick my son up from college. While he took his last exam, I took myself up a local hiking trail. Connecticut black flies are as bad as their Vermont cousins, and I brushed several of the little beasts out from under my hairline. It can be hard to think of these biting flies with anything but disdain, but they do serve important ecological functions. And in at least one case, they also solved a murder. Black fly larvae are little, black, and shaped like bowling pins. They live in rivers >>More


May, 2019

Preserving our Adirondack Lakes Talk in Luzerne


The Hadley-Lake Luzerne Historical Society has announced “Preserving Our Adirondack Lives,” a program set for Thursday, June 13th, at 7 pm, at the Hadley-Luzerne Public Library, 19 Main Street, Lake Luzerne. Jim Lieberum, Director of the Warren County Soil & Water Conservation District, will be guest speaker. Preserving Adirondack lakes has become more challenging over the past decade. Development, pollution, invasive species and overuse has led to both challenges and discoveries. The program is free and open to the public. For further information email kinnearmuseum@gmail.com. View original post.


May, 2019

Stewards to Greet Lake Champlain Boaters


2019 will be the fourteenth summer that the Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP) has operated its boat launch steward program. Stewards greet boaters on Lake Champlain in New York, Vermont and Québec from Memorial Day to late September. They inspect their boats for invasive organisms, and share information about the threats they pose. The boat launch stewards have greeted nearly a quarter million boaters and intercepted 5,400 invasive species since the program started in 2007 according to LCBP. The majority of these organisms have been found on boats leaving Lake Champlain, and could have been carried to other water bodies >>More


May, 2019

1970s Plattsburgh Elks Resisted Local Integration


Context is everything. So, without cherry-picking, here’s the exact, complete quotation from a longtime member and former leader defining a prominent group in Plattsburgh back in 1976. “The Elks are a fraternal organization based on the principles of charity, justice, brotherly love, and fidelity. Membership is open to men 21 years of age or older who are citizens of the United States, believe in God, and have not been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor involving moral issues. There is no discrimination against race, religion, politics, economic status, or any other circumstances.” Such beautiful words and noble sentiments … >>More


May, 2019

Long Lake Van Morrison Tribute Concert June 1st


The Town of Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department is set to host the Massachusetts Band, Moondance, The Ultimate Van Morrison Tribute on Saturday, June 1, 2019 at 7:30 pm at the 125-seat Long Lake Town Hall, one of the oldest buildings in the community. Moondance captures the Van Morrison concert experience with a five-piece band that hails from Massachusetts and can regularly be seen performing venues in and around the Springfield, MA region. Musicians include: Ed Moran on Lead Vocals, Dan Broad playing bass and vocals, Dana Welts on guitar, Vinnie Brandi on drums, Aaron Dean on Sax and >>More


May, 2019

Poetry: The Cardinals And The Bishop’s Son


The Cardinals And The Bishop’s Son ‘Twas a cold and sodden May, When Bishop’s Son and wife and pup, Traveled far, from South to the North, Where at home they did wind up. Bishop’s Son tended the land, Then saw unruly growth on trees, So raised his axe to trim the shrubs, When a sweet sight he did see. A nest of rosy hatchlings, With eyes still closed and mouths outstretched, As Red Father-Bird stood his guard, And Mother, more food did fetch. She, plain in plumage, did fly, From mate on fence, to branch, to nest, Singing proud of >>More


May, 2019

Featured Trail: New Northville-Placid Trail Spur, Long Lake


The new 2.2-mile spur trail connecting the 134-mile Northville-Placid Trail (NPT) to the hamlet of Long Lake in Hamilton County has officially opened. The spur trail provides ease of access to food, supplies, and lodging for backpackers through-hiking the NPT and is hoped to enhance the local economy. Located in the Blue Mountain Wild Forest, the spur trail connects with the NPT approximately 1.9 miles south of Route 28N. The connection is marked with yellow trail markers and includes 0.4 mile of the Three Brook Ski Loop Trail, 0.8 mile of recently constructed trail on Forest Preserve lands, » Continue >>More


May, 2019

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Study: Adks Warming 2X Faster That World Average DEC and State Police Resupply Interior Outposts Adirondack Park Agency Talks Carrying Capacity Adirondack Wild Calls For Action On Spruce Grouse Losing Upstate, Republicans Talk Secession, Voting Changes Rebuilding the Bartlett Carry Club Day-To-Day Financial Insecurity In Rural Communities Despite Falling Enrollments Schools’ Have Economic Impact Marjorie Morningstar Author Herman Wouk Dies At 103 New » Continue Reading. View original post.


May, 2019

Adirondack Experience Now Open


The folks at Adirondack Experience: the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake, which opens for the season today, have spent the winter updating and adding to its exhibits and creating new ones. The popular “Great Outdoors” and “Life In the Adirondacks” exhibits remain along with other permanent and scenic displays. The new Curious Creatures exhibit explores the relationship of humans, nature, and animals through taxidermy. Some of these private pieces have never been on public exhibition before.  Private Views: Collecting the Adirondacks features 19th century artists inspired to paint an Adirondack landscape. Borrowed from private collectors, this exhibit is a » >>More


May, 2019

‘Women Will Vote’ Exhibit Opening in Ticonderoga


The Ticonderoga Historical Society is set to unveil a traveling exhibit addressing Women’s Suffrage and present a free public program entitled “Women Will Vote” on Friday, May 31 at 7 pm at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle, Ticonderoga. The program will look at often-overlooked consequences of Women’s Suffrage, including internal disagreements that threatened to sideline the movement, the institution of Prohibition, and changes in women’s roles within the workforce. From the women’s suffrage movement’s 1848 Declaration of Sentiments, the right to vote took over 70 years to be adopted by Congress. Even after the passage of the amendment, ratification >>More