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Adirondack Explorer

January, 2005

Adirondack Wilderness
Author: Nathan Farb

Review by: NEAL BURDICK

Untrammeled by man—that was a key phrase in the Wilderness Act, which established the national wilderness system just over 40 years ago, before genderinclusive language gained currency. (Incidentally, the man who coined it, Howard Zahniser, was heavily influenced in his thinking by his experiences in the Adirondacks.) It’s also a phrase that could aptly characterize the sense one gets from perusing Nathan Farb’s much-anticipated new book, Adirondack Wilderness. There isn’t much evidence of trammeling by anybody. Actually, it’s not quite that simple. The fact that the Adirondack wilderness exists today is largely the result of human intervention and our impulse >>More


January, 2005

Cranberry Lake and Wanakena
Author: Susan Thomas Smeby

Review by: NEAL BURDICK

Old pictures fascinate us. They jumpstart memories among our elders and prompt younger viewers to wonder, “What was it like back then?” Pictures tell stories, and if we peer between the pixels, those of us who were not there can deduce something of what it was like “back then”— what people did for work and fun, how they designed their infrastructure, how they related to each other, even how photography was done. Hold the pictures up against today, and we can see how people have changed, how the land has changed, and how the relationship of people to the land >>More


January, 2005

Old Forge: Gateway to the Adirondacks
Author: Linda Cohen, Sarah Cohen and Peg Masters

Review by: NEAL BURDICK

Old pictures fascinate us. They jumpstart memories among our elders and prompt younger viewers to wonder, “What was it like back then?” Pictures tell stories, and if we peer between the pixels, those of us who were not there can deduce something of what it was like “back then”— what people did for work and fun, how they designed their infrastructure, how they related to each other, even how photography was done. Hold the pictures up against today, and we can see how people have changed, how the land has changed, and how the relationship of people to the land >>More


January, 2005

The Adirondacks
Author: Donald K. Williams

Review by: NEAL BURDICK

Old pictures fascinate us. They jumpstart memories among our elders and prompt younger viewers to wonder, “What was it like back then?” Pictures tell stories, and if we peer between the pixels, those of us who were not there can deduce something of what it was like “back then”— what people did for work and fun, how they designed their infrastructure, how they related to each other, even how photography was done. Hold the pictures up against today, and we can see how people have changed, how the land has changed, and how the relationship of people to the land >>More


January, 2005

Adirondack Lakes
Author: Thomas A Gates

Review by: NEAL BURDICK

Old pictures fascinate us. They jumpstart memories among our elders and prompt younger viewers to wonder, “What was it like back then?” Pictures tell stories, and if we peer between the pixels, those of us who were not there can deduce something of what it was like “back then”— what people did for work and fun, how they designed their infrastructure, how they related to each other, even how photography was done. Hold the pictures up against today, and we can see how people have changed, how the land has changed, and how the relationship of people to the land >>More


May, 2004

Canoe and Kayak Guide East-Central New York State
Author: Kathie Armstrong and Chet Harvey

Review by: MARK BOWIE

The Adirondack Mountain Club Canoe and Kayak Guide: East-Central New York State is the fourth in a series of guides to the canoeable waters of the state. It replaces ADK’s Adirondack Canoe Waters: South Flow and is chock-full of good information. Unlike its predecessor, this guidebook ranges far beyond the Blue Line to describe major rivers and tributaries in central and eastern New York and western Vermont, Massachusetts and Connecticut. Its focus, however, remains the Adirondacks. The Adirondack waters covered include the Hudson, Cedar, Miami, Boreas, Schroon and Sacandaga rivers, Cheney Pond, West Canada Creek, and Northwest Bay Brook on >>More


May, 2004

Adirondack Paddler’s Map
Author: Dave Cilley

Review by: MARK BOWIE

Paddlesports Press of Saranac Lake recently released the Adirondack Paddler’s Map, a waterproof, double-sided foldout of the northern Adirondack canoe country. It is a full-color, shaded-relief topographic map measuring about 36-by-44 inches. Though the generous size can be unwieldy, that can be excused, as it covers hundreds of miles of our paddling waters. It is absolutely beautiful! The cartography, based on state and federal geographic data, is by John Barge and Meg Van Dyck-Holmes. The map is the brainchild of Dave Cilley, owner of St. Regis Canoe Outfitters. He notes that the map’s scale of 1:50,000 (1 inch = 0.8 >>More


March, 2004

Adirondack Waterfall Guide
Author: Russell Dunn

Review by: NEAL BURDICK

Until 1979, Lampson Falls, on the northwest edge of the Adirondack Park, where the Grass River starts its tumble into the St. Lawrence Valley, was in private hands and off limits to the public. But thanks to the persistence of Paul Jamieson and others, the state bought the falls, and it is now a popular destination. I am among the spot’s devotees. I have visited the falls in all seasons, in many circumstances and have always found them captivating, whatever their mood (and mine). When I’m there, I often ask myself what it is about waterfalls that we find so >>More


March, 2004

And Gladly Guide: Reflections on a Life in the Mountains
Author: James A. Goodwin

Review by: NEAL BURDICK

I became acquainted with Jim Goodwin in 1969, in my first summer as a crew member at the Adirondack Mountain Club’s Johns Brook Lodge. Thanks to the generosity of the Goodwin family, we used their “summer place” (the last house before the trailhead, appropriately) as a base of operations, partly because one of Jim and Jane’s boys, Peter,was on the crew with me (their older son, Tony, also had been a “hut boy,” as we were called)— but mainly because that’s the kind of people the Goodwins were. Anyway, I got ready to assemble my load for the hike in >>More


January, 2004

Ice Palace
Author: Deborah Blumenthal, Illustrated by Ted Rand

Review by: TIM FORTUNE

If you’re interested in reliving days gone by in the cozy mountain village of Saranac Lake, while gaining an insight into the magical centerpiece of the nation’s oldest winter carnival, the newly published children’s book Ice Palace should delight you and your children. It seems the perfect bedtime story for a winter’s evening, with frost on the window and snow falling outside. Through the eyes of a young girl, author Deborah Blumenthal tells the story of a fantasy come to life, a palace built of big blocks of ice (weighing up to 800 pounds apiece) by real people in a >>More




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