November, 2013

Photographing the Adirondacks: Where to Find Perfect Shots and How to Take Them
Author: Carl Heilman II

Review by: Kenneth Aaron

Camera-ready scenery. IF YOU’RE A PHOTOGRAPHER looking for a shooter to emulate, Carl Heilman II is a fine choice. After all, Heilman has been creating iconic Adirondack images for decades, and he knows the hidden (and not-so-hidden) parts of the Adirondack Park as well as anybody. In his new book, Photographing the Adirondacks: Where to Find Perfect Shots and How to Take Them, Heilman gives you a map—literally—that will show you the way to many of the scenes that he’s built a career on. The 112-page book is broken into eight regions, covering sixty-four locations throughout the Adirondacks. Some of >>More


November, 2013

E-Book: Photographing the Adirondacks: Fall in the High Peaks Region
Author: Chris Tennant & Adam Baker

Review by: Kenneth Aaron

A photo app for autumn. You never know just how good leaf-peeping season will be. That’s OK—you can always get a dose of spectacular color in Chris Tennant and Adam Baker’s new e-book, Photographing the Adirondacks: Fall in the High Peaks Region. The 104-page PDF is available as a $7 download from www.adkbook.com. Unlike Carl Heilman’s book, Tennant and Baker’s book focuses on just one part of the Adirondacks, picking twenty-five locations where you might find great shooting. (Tennant included some of these tips and photos in an article about the Adirondacks in the October issue of Popular Photography.) Tennant >>More


July, 2010

Contemporary Landscape Photography
Author: Carl E. Heilman II With Greta Heilman-Cornell

Review by: Kenneth Aaron

CARLHEILMAN II takes the kind of iconic Adirondack photographs that make you want to quit your day job, blow lots of money on lenses, and head into the hills to capture some of those epic vistas yourself. The great thing about landscape photography is that everybody who wishes can shoot the same landscape. So everybody, you’d think, could take the same kind of landscape photographs. And, actually, most people do take the same kind of photos: blown-out highlights, shadows that swallow half the picture, being at the right place at the wrong time— these and other problems crop up in >>More


May, 2010

Adirondack Moments
Author: James Kraus

Review by: Phil Brown

JAMES KRAUS owes a lot to his father. He got interested in the outdoors when his father took him fishing and in photography when he received a box camera. He went on to teach forest recreation at Paul Smith’s College for thirty years and often incorporated photos into his lectures. Now retired, Kraus recently collected many of his photos into a book titled Adirondack Moments. He groups his photos into chapters, such as “Light,” “Mountains,” “Plants and Wildflowers,” and “Water.” He writes in the introduction that whenever he is in the woods or on the water, he remains watchful for >>More


September, 2009

Paul Smith’s Adirondack Hotel and College
Author: Neil Surprenant

Review by: Neal Burdick

Arcadia Publishing recently released two old-photo books as part of its “Images of America,” and both will appeal to aficionados of Adirondack history. One is about a famous person and his endeavors, the other about a famous place. Paul Smith is one of those larger-than-life figures in the region’s historic repertoire. In fact, he’s the only person to have a college (spelled with a possessive apostrophe) and a post office (without the apostrophe) named for him. Half a century after his death, he got his own zip code. In partnership with his wife, Lydia, Smith built a hotel on Lower >>More


September, 2009

Boats and Boating on Cranberry Lake
Author: Allen P. Splete

Review by: Neal Burdick

Arcadia Publishing recently released two old-photo books as part of its “Images of America,” and both will appeal to aficionados of Adirondack history. One is about a famous person and his endeavors, the other about a famous place. Paul Smith is one of those larger-than-life figures in the region’s historic repertoire. In fact, he’s the only person to have a college (spelled with a possessive apostrophe) and a post office (without the apostrophe) named for him. Half a century after his death, he got his own zip code. In partnership with his wife, Lydia, Smith built a hotel on Lower >>More


September, 2009

Historic Images of the Adirondacks
Author: Victoria Verner Sandiford

Review by: Neal Burdick

Old pictures are sure to please. And so Historic Images of the Adirondacks is a quick, enjoyable tour of life from 1870 to 1960, the period linking the oldest and youngest of the two hundred photographs reproduced in these pages. The photos are from the Adirondack Museum’s collection of eighty thousand pictures, and many of them have made appearances on the museum’s popular Photobelt, where you can sit mesmerized as image after image glides slowly by, and lose all track of time. The book is organized by region: Lake George, Old Forge, High Peaks, and so on. Collectively, the selections >>More


September, 2009

Lake George
Author: Carl Heilman II

Review by: Phil Brown

Carl Heilman II has just come out with Lake George, his third book of Adirondack photographs. Like his last one, The Adirondacks, this is a small-format book (7 by 5 inches) that sells for under $20. As the title indicates, he turned his lens on just part of the Adirondack Park, but it’s an especially iconic part: thirty-two-mile Lake George and its islands, peaks, and people.The photos show the region in all seasons and from many perspectives.You’ll find nature close-ups, mountaintop panoramas, aerial photos—he’s got the whole waterfront covered and then some. We’ve selected just a few of the 155 >>More


July, 2009

Lake Champlain: An Illustrated History
Author: Adirondack Life

Review by: Philip Terrie

On July 12, 1609, Samuel de Champlain, along with about sixty Canadian Indians, canoed into the lake that he quickly named after himself. On the twenty-ninth, the party spotted a band of Mohawks, enemies of his Algonquin allies. Abrief battle ensued the following morning, during which Champlain, pretty much without provocation, shot and killed two Mohawks and wounded another. Though historians are not certain where this deadly encounter occurred, the consensus places it near Ticonderoga. Champlain’s drawing of the battle, published in 1613, is the earliest known European depiction of any land inside what is now the Adirondack Park. Whether >>More


July, 2008

Northeast Passage: A Photographer’s Journey Along the Historic Northern Forest Canoe Trail
Author: Clyde Smith

Review by: MARK BOWIE

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT), formally incorporated in 2000, winds for 740 miles from Old Forge, in the western Adirondacks, to Fort Kent, Maine, on the Canadian border. Its interconnected waterways and portages trace paddling routes used hundreds of years ago by Native Americans and fur traders in New York, Vermont, southern Quebec, New Hampshire and Maine. The Adirondack section of the trail goes up the Fulton Chain of Lakes and down Browns Tract Inlet to Raquette Lake, then follows the Raquette River to Long Lake. At the foot of Long Lake, paddlers return to the river, taking it >>More


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