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Adirondack Explorer

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Current Conditions in the Adirondack Park (Oct 17)


This weekly Adirondack outdoor conditions report is issued on Thursday afternoons, year round. Get The Weekly Outdoor Conditions Podcast Listen for the weekly Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Report Friday mornings on WNBZ (AM 920 & 1240, FM 105 & 102.1), WSLP (93.3) and the stations of North Country Public Radio. The report can also be found at Mountain Lake PBS. SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND ** indicates new or revised items. ** COOL DAMP WEATHER: Cool temperatures, and cloudy skies with showers and snow are all forecast in the coming week » Continue Reading. The post Current Conditions in the Adirondack >>More


Thursday, October 17, 2013

The Rescue At Rogers Rock


Rogers Rock on Lake George is one of the most scenic cliffs in the Adirondacks, a spectacular place to climb on a crisp, clear fall day when you see for miles up and down the lake. My friend Mike Virtanen and I enjoyed just such a day last Sunday when we climbed Little Finger, a 490-foot route that follows a long crack that splits the slab. Incidentally, the slab rises straight out of the lake. We got there by canoeing from the Rogers Rock State Campground. Little Finger is the most popular route on Rogers Rock (the guidebook Adirondack Rock >>More


Thursday, October 17, 2013

Growing the Great Pumpkin in Northern New York


In the Peanuts comic strip, the precocious, blanket-toting Linus waited faithfully for The Great Pumpkin all night on Halloween in spite of being disappointed every year. Perhaps his unwavering belief in the mythical pumpkin was spurred on by the fact that almost every year brings the world a bigger “great pumpkin” of the sort one can measure and—at least potentially—eat.Of the approximately 1.5 billion pounds of pumpkins grown annually in the U.S., only a very few are grown for size. Primarily within the last thirty years, giant pumpkin enthusiasts (that’s regular-size people, giant produce) have developed varieties that attain jaw-dropping >>More


Thursday, October 17, 2013

Dan Crane: Making Repairs in the Backcountry


Exploring the Adirondack backcountry is an arduous activity, demanding as much from the participant as from their equipment. Although this remains true for traditional trail hiking, it is even more so for its less conventional sibling of bushwhacking. Regardless, even the most durable gear can break, fall apart, pop, unravel or disintegrate at the most inappropriate moment, requiring some type of repair job that at the very least allows for a humbling exit from the backcountry. The best offense is a good defense when it comes to any backcountry gear. Purchasing high quality gear, well made with durable materials, is >>More


Thursday, October 17, 2013

The Fulton Chain Steamer ‘Fawn’


In 2008, an exhibit at the Goodsell Museum in Old Forge honored the train stations used by the railroads of the West Central Adirondacks.  The first railroad in the region, nicknamed the “Peg Leg Railroad” or “Wooden Railroad”, did not quite extend to the Forge Tract as planned.  But a more “green” option, in both literal and modern metaphorical terms, provided the additional distance not permitted to this railroad.  The vehicle of the landowner’s choice was a steamer that, in the event of a boiler fire, would have sufficient water available to quench the fire. Julia deCamp’s father Lyman R. >>More


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Dave Gibson: Forest Preserve Land Sought For Mining Company Is Hardly Ordinary


Bill Ingersoll’s recent post about the November 5 vote on the NYCO Minerals-State Land Exchange (Proposition 5 on the upcoming ballot) makes good reading – as do the comments. His interpretation, that the land exchange stripped-down to its essence represents a straight commercial transaction that lacks any public need or benefit, is one Adirondack Wild shares, but Bill made an especially articulate case. One of the interesting comments to Bill’s post comes from my colleague Dan Plumley. Dan notes that the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s characterization of “Lot 8,” the 200-acre section of Jay Mountain Wilderness the company » >>More


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

DEC Opens Trail to Loon Lake Mountain Fire Tower


A 2.8-mile trail to the fire tower on the summit of Loon Lake Mountain in the northern Adirondacks is complete and open to the public, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced. The new trail includes a parking area and trailhead on the west side of County Route 26 in the Town of Franklin in Franklin County, approximately 4.7 miles north of the hamlet of Loon Lake. The trailhead and the lower portion of the trail are on the Kushaqua Tract Conservation Easement Lands (CEL), while the upper portion is on forest preserve lands in the >>More


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

The Correction: Two Sides of Prison Life


Joe Hackett has spent time in prison. Yes, the well known local guide, columnist, and scout for Seventh Avenue has spent years in jail, not as a inmate, but as a recreation coordinator at Camp Gabriels, a former New York State Minimum Security prison shuttered a few years ago by the state. Once a tuberculosis sanatorium, the 92-acre facility was sold to the state in 1982, which operated it as a 336 bed-prison until 2009. There many of the prisoners worked on forestry and community service-related, projects, yet not-withstanding, it was prison far, far from home and family for the >>More


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Gabriels: The Great Adirondack Corn Maze


I am not one that searches out various ways to be frightened. I have to dial down my 10-year-old’s enthusiastic Halloween decorating, not for lack of creativity, but because I don’t want to be terrified entering my own house. I’ll compromise with a few fake spider webs draped across the porch because we more often than not have the real thing hanging around anyway. As far as activities go, the Great Adirondack Corn Maze in Gabriels manages to thrill all ages and fear levels of my family. With a 10th anniversary theme, this year’s 10-acre maze has ten mailboxes tucked >>More


Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Wildlife Preparing for Winter: The Garter Snake


Migration is the seasonal movement of an animal population in response to changing environmental conditions. While birds are best known for employing this survival strategy to cope with winter, many other forms of wildlife also engage in some form of relocation during autumn to deal with prolonged bouts of cold and an absence of food. Among the migratory reptiles in the Adirondacks is an abundant and widespread snake familiar to anyone that spends time outdoors – the garter snake. As daylight wanes and the temperatures cool, garter snakes begin to travel to various sites that afford protection from the intense >>More