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  1. […] feature-length article from the Adirondack Explorer dives deeply into the problem of white-nose fungus that’s […]

  2. Scientists pin down cause of bat disease | says:

    […] this year, Winnie Yu reported in the Explorer that the number of little brown bats in the Adirondacks—once the most common bat […]

  3. […] hope of observing a single bat. Unfortunately, no bats ever appear as the white-nose syndrome has decimiated many bat species in the Adirondacks. With the mosquitoes swarming around my head, I can wait no longer and I retreat to my tarp for the […]

  4. […] Some of the bats are killed more quickly as oxygen supplies are choked off, wing tissues die, and dehydration sets in. Many dead bats are found emaciated (Adirondack Explorer). […]

  5. […] 60 percent. Northern bats—the species that’s been hardest hit—are down 98 percent” (Adirondack Explorer). It would not be surprising for the Northern Bat to become completely extinct in the Adirondack […]

  6. Adirondack Bats: Endangered Bats - Lake Champlain Life says:

    […] percent. Northern bats—the species that’s been hardest hit—are down 98 percent” (Adirondack Explorer). It would not be surprising for the Northern Bat to become completely extinct in the […]

  7. Adirondack Bats: White-nose Syndrome - Lake Champlain Life says:

    […] Some of the bats are killed more quickly as oxygen supplies are choked off, wing tissues die, and dehydration sets in. Many dead bats are found emaciated (Adirondack Explorer). […]

  8. Adirondack Bats: Endangered Bats says:

    […] down 60 percent. Northern bats—the species that’s been hardest hit—are down 98 percent” (Adirondack Explorer). It would not be surprising for the Northern Bat to become completely extinct in […]

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